Three reasons why you should get excited to be a prehospital provider

“Contentment is the refuge of the boring and the uninspired” -Ralph Waldo Emerson

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Dr. John Hinds responding. (via Twitter)

Prehospital providers have always been particularly prone to complacency. Once the novelty of running code-3 wears off, routine transports and inglorious 911 responses threaten to demoralize providers and make them content with only the knowledge and skills needed for “the everyday.”

So let’s examine the extraordinary and apply it to the ordinary. Here are three incredible examples of prehospital FOAM that should get your blood flowing once again. Be inspired, share it with others, and bring your game face to each and every call

1) The First Prehospital REBOA— EMCrit chats with the first provider (registrar Jonny Price from London HEMS) to have performed a prehospital REBOA. What is REBOA? Essentially it inflates a balloon that occludes the aorta to stop bleeding at non-compressible points of hemorrhage. Why should you get excited? They did prehospitally what once only a full resuscitative thoracotomy and aortic clamp would. And a paramedic assisted with the procedure.

2) Making the Call— Again via EMCrit, Michael Lauria (@resuspadawan)–formerly of USAF Pararescue and then Dartmouth-Hitchcock Advanced Rescue Team (DART)–applies techniques and lessons learned during his time in the Special Forces to working as a prehospital provider. Why should you get excited? Mike speaks authoritatively on how providers can apply techniques used by Special Forces to improve their cognitive decision making under stress and keep a cool head in the inevitable cluster-call.

3) Motobike Mayhem— Dr. John Hinds (@DocJohnHinds) gives an incredible lecture outlining some of the traumatic injuries that result from high-speed motorcycle crashes. Listen to it and flip through the slides at the same time. No part of you will be disappointed. Why should you get excited? This team treats injuries similar to those that could be seen by any prehospital provider and have spectacular resuscitations. And it’s motobike EMS. Need I say more?

I recognize that not all of this is directly applicable to everyday-American-EMS, but that doesn’t mean that we discount it as irrelevant. All of these things are being done outside of the hospital by those who aren’t complacent with their everyday medicine. And I don’t see any reason why we can’t work our way there too.